Supreme Court sides with baker in same-sex wedding case

Supreme Court sides with baker in same-sex wedding case

Supreme Court sides with baker in same-sex wedding case

He cited his Christian faith in refusing, and the duo then summoned the power of a leftist state Civil Rights Commission, which ordered Phillips, and his staff, to go through reindoctrination.

In the end, the decision was modest enough to attract the votes of liberal and conservative justices on a subject that had the potential for sharp division.

"The outcome of cases like this in other circumstances must await further elaboration in the courts", Kennedy said. The court didn't say that it's unconstitutional the government to apply discrimination laws to baking a cake.

During oral arguments in the case before the Supreme Court, Kennedy has expressed concern over these words from the commission, prompting observers to speculate might issue a decision punting in the case and remanding it for reconsideration without hostility toward religion.

"The commission's hostility was inconsistent with the First Amendment's guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral toward religion", Kennedy said, adding to say that the case was narrow.

He appealed the state's decision, but lost in the Colorado courts.

"The commission's hostility was inconsistent with the First Amendment's guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral toward religion", J. Anthony Kennedy wrote in the majority opinion, adding that the Commission "showed elements of a clear and impermissible hostility toward the honest religious beliefs motivating" Phillips.

That same sentiment suffused his opinion on Monday.

"Ultimately, the Court ruled that when a state prohibits public accommodation discrimination, the process must be free from overt religious hostility", Kreis said. Kagan wrote separately to emphasize the limited ruling. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote a dissent, joined by Justice Sonia Sotomayor. State law at the time allowed merchants some latitude to decline specific messages, such as those demeaning gay people and gay marriages.

Mullins and Craig successfully brought their complaint to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission.


President Donald Trump's administration intervened in the case in support of Mr Phillips.

Kennedy wrote that the question of when religious beliefs must give way to anti-discrimination laws might be different in future cases.

Kennedy said the commission showed a clear and impermissible hostility toward the honest religious beliefs motivating Phillips' objections to making the custom cake.

The Civil Rights Commission had required bakery owner Jack Phillips to either make cakes for gay weddings or stop making custom wedding cakes at all.

The commission and later the Colorado Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the two men.

The American Civil Liberties Union released a statement on Twitter following the ruling.

Former state Attorney General Rob McKenna says courts must apply anti-discrimination laws fairly - Colorado and Washington state laws protect same-sex couples.

Waggoner and Esseks disagreed about the ruling's effect on Phillips' wedding cake business. Yet, we wouldn't want to extend that protection to everyone and everything related to marriage.

"What matters is that Phillips would not provide a good or service to a same-sex couple that he would provide to a hetereosexual couple". Therefore, Kennedy concluded, the commission's order - which, among other things, required Phillips to sell same-sex couples wedding cakes or anything else that he would sell to opposite-sex couples and mandated remedial training and compliance reports - "must be set aside".

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