NRA depicts children's show characters in KKK hoods to criticize cast diversity

NRA depicts children's show characters in KKK hoods to criticize cast diversity

NRA depicts children's show characters in KKK hoods to criticize cast diversity

National Rifle Association spokeswoman Dana Loesch chose to take children's show "Thomas & Friends" to task for plans to introduce more "diverse" trains, by depicting the talking locomotives in KKK hoods. It was the white hoods.

'They've decided that the next stop is Virtue Town, ' the disgruntled conservative said during the segment.

Loesch decried the shoehorning of politically correct female and ethnic minority characters into a children's tv show about "really weird anthropomorphic trains" who answer to "an authoritarian maniac named Sir Topham Hat".

A majority of Loesch's fury was directed towards the introduction of Nia - a steam engine from Kenya. "Seriously, one of those trains, Nia, will be from Kenya to add ethnic diversity to the show". "Because they're trains, they don't even have skin pigmentation!"

"Oh, I see, it was because of the white hoods and the burning train tracks..." Suddenly an image of Thomas and his friends in Ku Klux Klan hoods on burning train tracks flashes on screen.

Loesch continued: 'OK, fine, fair point.


On Friday, Mattel announced that "Thomas & Friends" would incorporate more diverse characters from around the world in a partnership with the United Nations and its Sustainable Development Goals. "Fair. I get it. Thomas the Tank Engine has been a blight on race relations for far too long". "Clearly this is overdue, right?"

The latest series of Thomas will see the famous engine and his friends travel and explore the world.

The "some sort of African pattern on the side of Nia's engine" that Loesch referenced is a "design based on traditional Maasai and Samburu patterns", according to the Brand South Africa website.

"I mean, I'm looking at this picture and I'm really, really struggling to understand how in the world there isn't any diversity in any of this", she said on "Relentless", the NRA TV program she hosts.

Mattel gave a response to New York Times, saying "We are not associated with images that promote hate and denounce any images of our brands that are being used to convey a message not in line with the values of the company".

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