Water park closes after surfer dies from 'brain-eating' bacteria

Water park closes after surfer dies from 'brain-eating' bacteria

Water park closes after surfer dies from 'brain-eating' bacteria

Fabrizio Stabile, 29, from New Jersey, had recently visited the wave pool of a surf resort in Texas.

A "brain-eating amoeba" infection is the suspected cause of death for a 29-year-old New Jersey man who died after visiting a Texas water park, according to his family.

Once he returned home to New Jersey, Stabile complained of a severe headache on September 16, according to a GoFundMe campaign set up to spread awareness about N. fowleri.

Known as "Fab", Stabile was born in Bloomsberg, Pennsylvania, and loved spending time outdoors, according to his obituary in the Press of Atlantic City.

In a statement, Stuart Parsons Jr., the owner of BSR Cable Park, said his "hearts and prayers" are with Stabile's family.

It causes the nervous-system infection primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) by traveling up a person's nostrils and into their brain, but can not be transmitted if a person swallows water contaminated with the bug.

Naegleria fowleri is commonly referred to as the "brain-eating amoeba".


Stabile, whose family said he was an avid outdoorsman who loved to surf, had been at the park on vacation.

"Our hearts and prayers are with his family, friends and the New Jersey surf community during this hard time", Parsons told CBS.

Stabile's family have launched a GoFundMe for the Fabrizio Stabile Foundation for Naegleria Fowleri Awareness, in hopes of educating more people about the infection.

The surf resort has been closed pending the test results from the CDC, he said. It takes an average of five days for symptoms to appear exposure, with headache, fever and nausea the main symptoms.

He said the surf resort, which operates an artificial man-made wave, is in compliance with the CDC's "guidelines and recommendations concerning Naegleria fowleri".

Naegleria fowleri can not be contracted by swallowing contaminated water, according to the CDC. Swallowing water contaminated by the amoeba can not cause the infection.

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