Climate change report urges immediate action

Climate change report urges immediate action

Climate change report urges immediate action

This is why the latest report from the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) makes for such alarming reading and demands immediate, concerted action from everyone - particularly our leaders.

"Several regional changes in climate are assessed to occur with global warming up to 1.5 degree Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels, including warming of extreme temperatures in many regions (high confidence), increases in frequency, intensity, and/or amount of heavy precipitation in several regions (high confidence), and an increase in intensity or frequency of droughts in some regions (medium confidence)".

At 1.5 degrees of warming, compared with pre-industrial levels, as much as 90 per cent of the world's coral reefs will die, and virtually all would be lost if temperatures rose two degrees, or about twice the increase so far. The scientists concluded that carbon dioxide emissions should be cut 45% by 2030 from 2010 levels then reduced to zero by 2050.

Limiting warming to 1.5°C by making green changes in energy consumption, land and water use and transportation can help mitigate the potential damage to an extent.

The scientists claim increased temperatures are leading to extreme weather, rising sea levels, and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes to the environment.

Promises made by countries to cut their emissions up to 2030 will not limit global warming to 1.5C even if action is massively scaled up after the end of the next decade, the report warns.

Experts across the globe have put their collective heads together to deliver a landmark report on the potentially devastating impact of climate change - and their conclusions are not good news.

Envoys at the 2015 Paris talks asked the IPCC to study what it would take to limit warming to 1.5 degrees, a more ambitious goal than the previous 2-degree target.

However, the IPCC report's authors said the world would face severe consequences if the great bulk of fossil fuels including coal, oil and gas, weren't left in the ground.


The global temperature is now 1°C warmer than pre-industrial levels. "Limiting warming to 1.5ºC is possible within the laws of chemistry and physics but doing so would require unprecedented changes", says Jim Skea, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III, in a press statement.

One of the biggest surprises leading up to the 2015 global Paris Agreement on climate-changing emissions was an argument about a new goal.

The report also highlights the risk to further investments in natural gas-fired power plants and suggests that more of them should be replaced by renewables, said Han Chen, who follows energy finance for the Natural Resources Defense Council. Therefore, even though urgent action is a necessity, it should be equitable and the onus of addressing climate change can not fall on the developing world.

Global Warming of 1.5 °C is the first in a series of Special Reports to be produced in the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Cycle.

"Frankly, the more we are prepared to make changes to behavioural patterns that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the less we would need to rely later on more hard options that we don't yet fully understand like carbon dioxide removal", said Prof Jim Skea. The IPCC 1.5 report starkly illustrates the difference between temperature rises of 1.5°C and 2°C-for many around the world this is a matter of life and death.

But the report said the efficacy of measures, such as planting forests, bioenergy use or capturing and storing CO2, were unproven at a large scale and carried some risks. The report was prepared under the scientific leadership of all three IPCC working groups. This will mean a lot for our ability to bring you news, perspectives and analysis from the ground so that we can make change together. If we eliminated all our emissions today, we would still see a bit more warming (as sunlight-reflecting aerosol pollution quickly washed out of the atmosphere, for example) but probably not enough to send us coasting helplessly across the 1.5°C limit.

How Much Global Warming Has There Been Already?

Donate At Caribbean News Service, we do not charge for our content and we want to keep it that way.

Noticias relacionadas



[an error occurred while processing the directive]