Yutu-2 rover reawakens after midday nap to continue Chang'e-4 objectives

Yutu-2 rover reawakens after midday nap to continue Chang'e-4 objectives

Yutu-2 rover reawakens after midday nap to continue Chang'e-4 objectives

Included in the pictures is a 360-degree panorama stitched together from 80 photos taken by a camera on the lander after it released the rover onto the lunar surface, Xinhua said, citing Li Chunlai, deputy director of the National Astronomical Observatories of China and commander-in-chief of the ground application system of Chang'e 4.

The Chang'e-4 lander and rover made a soft-landing within a pre-selected landing area of the Von Kármán crater at 02:26 universal time January 3, with the Yutu-2 rover being deployed 12 hours later.

China's Jade Rabbit-2 rover awoke from its extended nap on the moon on Thursday, taking to social media to inform space enthusiasts that it's headed back to work after its five-day hibernation.

Information can not be sent directly from the lunar far side to Earth - the moon's bulk gets in the way.

"The thicker dust shows that the lunar regolith in the region has undergone longer space weathering, which also gives strong evidence of the region being older".

The moon's surface on this side is thicker and more pitted than the familiar earth facing side.


Yutu-2 is set to rover to the front side of the lander and return an image of the craft, like that taken by its predecessor Yutu for the Chang'e-3 mission above, before continuing to explore using its suite of science instruments.

Because the far side faces away from Earth, it is also shielded from radio transmissions - making it the flawless place from where to study the universe.

The message, a reference to a past Chinese office tradition, was quickly met with joy as several netizens wished the rover luck on it endeavors on the far side of the moon. The moon is tidally locked to Earth, rotating at the same rate that it orbits our planet, so the far side - or the "dark side" - is never visible from Earth.

The SPA Basin, where the Chang'e-4 probe landed, is the largest and deepest basin in the solar system, with a diameter of 2,500 km and a depth of more than 10 km.

"We chose a vertical descent strategy to avoid the influence of the mountains on the flight track", Zhang He, executive director of the Chang'e-4 project said in a statement. The exploration might offer clues as to why the bombardment occurred, said Zou.

Noticias relacionadas



[an error occurred while processing the directive]